Morganite Engagement Rings: The increasingly sought after alternative

Morganite engagement rings are growing in popularity – and for good reason. This feminine gemstone makes a powerful romantic statement.
In spite of its delicate appearance, morganite is a durable gemstone antagonizing the traditional diamond, not only in hardness and beauty but also in its comparatively more affordable price tag.

Here’s what you need to know about this trending pink gem.

What is the morganite gemstone?

Sometimes called pink emerald, morganite is a rare semi-precious stone. It’s the soft pink variety of beryl, a mineral species that includes more familiar beryls like Emerald, Heliodor, and Aquamarine.
Albeit not as popular, morganite is one of the most admired gems amongst the beryl group, due to its rare tender color, ranging from delicate pastel to rose, peachy, and salmon pink.
Morganite is a 7.5 to 8 on the Mohs scale of hardness which makes it absolutely suitable for everyday wear.

Where does morganite come from?

Discovered in Madagascar in 1910 by George F. Kunz – the chief color stone specialist at Tiffany & Co at the time, and noted gemologist – morganite was named after the American financier and gem enthusiast J. P. Morgan. Being also Morgan’s personal gemologist, Kunz proposed to name the stone in his honor after examining early samples of the gorgeous pink beryl.

Nowadays, the two most significant Morganite deposits are found in Madagascar and Brazil. Some fine gem-quality Morganites can also be found in Afghanistan, China, Mozambique, Namibia, Russia, Zimbabwe and the USA (California and Maine).

Why is morganite so popular?

Morganite boasts enchanting shades of rose and peachy pink, with a high degree of brilliance, making it an extremely easy stone to fall in love with.
However, the recent trend itself seems to have started peaking up around 2002, when Ben Affleck proposed to Jennifer Lopez with a 6.1 carat (ct) pink diamond.
In the meantime, millennial pink was on the rise, picking up momentum with Apple introducing its rose gold iPhone, a fashion style that put rose gold in the spotlight as a sought after jewelry. The soft pink hues of the morganite came in to compliment the rose gold, as a match made in heaven. The affordability of morganite compared to pink diamonds took the trend within reach of young brides-to-be. The secret was out, and morganite found itself at the epicenter of attention amongst those looking for a uniquely romantic statement ring.

Looking for inspiration?

We have perfected our morganite designer ring collection to showcase the feminine and delicate peachy-pink color of the alluring and romantic morganite gemstone. With exquisite designs and meticulous craftsmanship, our morganite gemstones are set in bright white gold or, captivating rose gold with glittering diamonds for additional sparkle.


Pear-Shaped Elegance
This rose gold halo engagement ring will capture the eye of many admirers. Featuring shared prong set diamonds encircling the pear shape morganite center, with additional diamonds cascading down the dainty shank for a look of sheer elegance.

Radiant Romance
A radiant engagement ring in rose gold, featuring a pear-shaped morganite in an illusion setting. The ring is also decorated with diamonds along the band and on the outside of the setting itself, giving it that extra brilliance.

Boldly Stunning
This halo engagement ring will capture the eye of many admirers. Featuring shared prong set diamonds encircling the cushion cut morganite center, with additional diamonds cascading down the dainty shank for a look of sheer elegance.

Gracefully Unique
An engagement ring on white gold that is boasting a unique design, this option features an impressive pear-shaped morganite center, sitting on a heart-shaped row of diamonds for added sparkle. A ring that is sure to get people talking!

Dainty in Rose
This rose gold engagement ring combines simplicity and uniqueness in a dainty design. The round center morganite sits beautifully on the pave setting adorning the band.
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